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Bertha Park High Radio
Bertha Park High Radio

Season 1, Episode · 10 months ago

Bob's Big Broadcast Episode 2

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Robert interviews Inspector Frazer Robertson of the British Transport Police. 

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Bob Broadcast. Ladies and Gentlemen,welcome to Bob's big broadcasts. Today I'm here with Inspector Freezer Robertson of theBritish Transport Police. So Hollo there, Robert, and many thanks for havingme on the show. Certainly when I was at high school back in thes, the very thought of a radio station was a foreign concept that wewere lucky to have what we called the Big Teley, which get wheel donenow and again, and lates and classrooms. So certainly having a radio station atbirth the park's a huge leap forward. It's now the twenty one century,I suppose, but you're making me feel old. And so to introducemyself. My Name's Fraser Robertson and I'm...

...a temporary police inspector with British TransportPolice. I'm currently what they call a duty officer and I'm based down ata divisional headquarters in Glasgow. I have seventeen years service and in fact againtook up a few and old many of the People's that attend birth the park. It would have been born when I first started back in February two thousandand for as a probationer at Edinburgh Waverley. I was promoted to the Dank ofsergeant in two thousand and fifteen and in that role I've had a varietyof sort of rules. I've been respont sergeant in Edinburgh, Glasgow, custodysergeant in Livingston and what we call neighborhood policing sergeant, covering both East andnorth of Scotland and more recently officer in charge at Pearth and starling. Nowyou work for the British Transport Police, or BTP. Did you give usa backstory to the BTP as then?...

From was it created, its purpose, etc? For me the history of BTP's fascinating and it was formed backin one thousand nine hundred and forty nine, but can trace its origins much furtherand back to the very birth of Britain railways, to the thirteen ofJune, thousand eighteen and twenty six. Just one superintendent and then for officersformed the organization which predates the Metropolitan Police by roughly three years. Our organizationis always been at the very forefront of a police saying them with pushed manyboundaries, with a number of proud firsts, and me, one thousand nine hundredand seventeen. Sergeant Margaret Hood joined the ranks to help with a shortageof male officers who were off fighting and the front lines on the UN beingcontinent during World War One. Now more than one fifteen hundred women helped formerranks, with our most senior officer who is female, and the recently appointedChief Constable, Lucy the Orsi, has...

...joined our organization into me's a realtestament of how far we've come, and just over those hundred years, inone century. Well, also the first four step point, please dogs andagain that was to us with both security and intection of crime on our docks. More recently, a certainly in two thousand and twenty one or a checktemporary chief constable, we will be sent to step down. A doing handstock was the first thing the UK to hold the most senior rank, well, identifying as an openly gay man. And again a real testament to howfar organization has come. To our understanding, the British Transport Police is separate frompolice Scotland. Could you tell us why this is so? I haveto say, Robert, what a crack in question. And I suppose youask different people you may get a different response and the answers quite complex tobe fair, and there's a range of...

...reasons why we're separate. Partly it'sthe history, partly it's the the geography, but in fact the Scottish government onlyrecently considered amalgamating British answer police and police Scotland. Around three thousand fivehundred officers operate and a very unique, challenging and often dangerous environment and wework in Scotland, England and Wales. Our officers are specially trained and experienceto police more than tenzero miles of track, over three thousand stations and more thansix million passengers travel by train somewhere in the network every day. Onoccasions are crime scene or instant can be in the move and this can prove, you know, particularly challenging as it can often cross borders with additional leegededof differences which can often approve particularly operationally challenging to the general public. However, they will often not be a look...

...at the difference between British ends orpolice and police Scotland and ultimately our officers trained side by side at the ScottishPolice College at Tolly Island and have a we have sorry and enhanced relationship theteam. They working together as required. Everybody can guess the life of asan officer of police Scotland, but what is it like in your day today life as an officer of the BE TP? Essentially, no two daysare the same and for me that's why I love it. Sir Robert Peel, who many a credit as the father of police sying, established what wecall the Sir Robert Peel's please seeing principles, which were adopted in the earlier neeteen century and are still as valid to day as they were when theywere conceived. In short, they promoted three core elements. One was theprevention of crime, the second building strong and positive relationships with the public andthe third operating with complete impartiality, fairness...

...and accountability. I have to seeRobert Peel's an extremely interesting man. So again, if you're interested in learningmore, you can Google Robert Peel's pleasing principles for more information. But backto your original question again. At what is the you know, a dayto day life of a BAUTP officer? Well, to be fair, officersare actively patrolling the new real network day to day and it's our rule toensure that were visible and approachable, preventing crime and assisting the public well travelingon the real network. A few of my personal career highlights have been assistingand pleasing in the London the Olympics and, two thousand and twelve, the GlasgowCommonwealth Games. In two thousand and fourteen, I've walked the length ofthe fourth real bridge and was quite busy when I came off. And again, a personal favorite well, marching down the Royal Mail and full uniform representingour organization as part of Edinburgh Pride.

Staying on the subject of being amember of the BTP, what's your favorite part of the job? What's themy favorite part? For me, it's the sense that you're making are youand lasting a positive difference to someone's life. But there are occasions when would askto deal with very stressful and at times tragic events and we often runtowards situations that others may run away from. But being the person that others lookto for help, for advice and support for me is hugely rewarding.Sometimes we often forget and take for granted, and it's definitely what motivates met someseventeen years hence joining. Now everybody knows the emergency number and how tocontact the police to report a crime. How to do this with the BritishTransport Police, however. So first of...

...all, suppose it's really important tounderline that in an emergency always dial nine hundred and ninety nine, and nonemergency calls it's eight hundred forty, fifty forty. That's a free phone number. We are the only force to offer a tech service. So if youwanted to text us, you can text us on six, one zero,one six. If you are text thing, remember to tell us the location you'reat or the train that you're on, etc. Just so we're able toget officers to you. I required and again, you can find moreinformation about a BTP and all these things I've just talked about at BTP dot, please dot. UK. Trains are great form of transportation, but theyare dangerous. What advice, kind of BTP officer gift for Train and StationSafety? And you know, I'd like to start by saying that actually therailway, and excuse the Pun, but...

...has a fantastic track record. Sorryif use correctly, but it can be extremely dangerous if miss used. Trains, first of all, so here's some of the sort of facts that theyquick firefacs that and the big hitters. Trains can travel up to a hundredand twenty miles per hour on the real network in the UK and that's almosttwice what they would travel on the motorway. Now, whenever I visit skills anddone safety talks, if ask people stick your hand up if you goand play on the motorway, no'b be puts the hand up because of coursethat seems daft. But of course cars are moving much more frequently in therear the motorway. But on the railway it could be maybe one or twotrains and our but you don't know when the next change coming there. Doingcould be delayed, there could be free that's maybe not scheduled and you wouldn'tbe able to find out to the public. So always expect to train and neverplay on the real network. If a driver watch to see you,of course they can't swear. They can only hit the break and hope andperhaps sound the horn. And while that...

...train is coming to a stop,if it's traveling a hundred and twenty miles an hour because it's so heavy andbecause, again, they don't have enhanced tires like a car that grip theroad. It's metal and metal. It's slides and grains its way for upto a mile and a half before it stops, which is approximately two kilometers. That's twenty lengths of a football pitch. So again, even although the drivermight see you, it might not be able to stop in time.So again, don't trace pass on the real network. I should also pointout it's actually a criminal offense to be up trespassing on the tracks and youcan be fined up to a thousand pounds and end up a criminal record.So you don't want to be coming to an attention for the wrong reasons.Overheads, that's the cables that you'll often see that train carriages draw the powerfrom. They carry up to twenty five thousand volts. Now Your House willcarry about one percent of that. Plug...

...in your house it carries about onepercent of that. So it's a hundred times more powerful and it's so powerful, in fact, that it can actually jump, or what we call arc, up to three meters, almost like lightning. So again, it canjump and strike the individual or anything that individual is in contact with, whetherit be a fishing rod, whether it be a kite, whether it bea piece of rope again that can transfer the electricity and its severely enjoy theend of a dual to again, overheads are to be avoided at all costs. Platforms. Again, you know started this and I kind of want tofinish it that way. The real network is incredibly safe and again, ifuse correctly, you shouldn't come to harm. But again, where people often comeand stuck as where the lack of concentration slips again as the platform edge. So always stay back from the platform age. Often there's a white linewhich it can as the demarcation. You should only be crossing that line wheneverreal service comes to a stop. Again,...

...so steed back from the platform ageto avoid falling between the train and the platform or being struck by thetrain as it passes. One thing to point you in the direction of ana lot of you are homeschooling at the moment. A lockdowns be the challenge, but it's all but actually, network real have got a fantastic safety educationsection on the website. So if you need any further information, give them, you know, a look. A quick Google set for network real safetyeducation will bringing up a range of different activities that you can print off athome and a work on. Last thing to talk about in terms of safety. If you ever need someone and you're at a station, there's always thecall point or what we call a help to point. If you press thatbutton for assistance, it's monitor twenty four hours a day, seven days aweek, three hundred and sixty five days a year, and it's someone fromScott Real or one of the other a train operating companies will be able toeither get us to your attention and to...

...your side as soon as we canor they'll often be able to rectify what your question. A problem is ifpeople are interested in the British Transport Police's work working, they find more informationabout you guys. So again it's twenty one century. Embrace it. TheInternet, as your friend British Tis replease have a range of social media channels. By all means, like us, tweet us, follow us. Sowe're on facebook, we're on twitter. What on Instagram? We've got afantastic youtube channel and again, a number of air clips that you're able towatch there and again, our website, which I mentioned earlier on as whatwas it? I know trying to scramble for a piece of paper. It'sBTP DOT place dot UK. They're rather cheekily. You have asked the enddrover. Do all police officers like donuts? And in short, yes we do. I have yet to meet a police officer that will turn down adonut. Often do the nature of our...

...job. We can be running,jumping, climbing trees and we don't get a maybe a ten or twelver ashift, the opportunity to sit down and have a proper meal, particular onthe back shifts. When people are sitting down to you know, they're dinner, knife and fork. We are maybe shoveling a best getting a cup oftea. So I donut is often a good way to grab a snack onthe goal. I have to say that my personal favorite as Gregg's custard fudgedonut and a strong coffee helps get me through. And because it's the radio, I suppose I should point out that other brands are available. Thank youfor coming on today's show, Fraser, but as all the time that wehave for today, the only thing to mention is Robert Manie. Thanks forhaving me in the show. It's great to be able to represent BTP andgive your guys a beer at the park and those listening a little more ofan insight into the unique role of BETP. Again, incredibly proud to work forthe force and it's been an absolute...

...pleasure being in the show. Thanks, Robert. By know remember that you can report a transport crime by callingOh eight, hundred four zero, zero for zero, or Textingo one six. You can also visit their twitter at BTP Scotland and their website over atBTP dot police dots UK. Thank you again for inspector phraser Robertson of theBritish Transport Police, for coming on today's show, and thank you to everyonewho is listened to this podcast. My name is Bob and that's all fortoday. Goodbye.

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